Managing a Multicloud

There is no denying that the future of cloud is not just with a single provider, capable asĀ Azure, AWS and the other public providers are. For true data protection, your information needs to be in three separate locations, and with the rise of data sovereignty, there is a need for data to be kept within the boundaries of a nation-state. GDPR will place other obligations on companies and their data compliance. Smaller countries will suffer more than larger ones, with their multiple regions and zones per country per cloud provider. Smaller countries like the UK will have problems, as a single provider will not have three regions for true resiliency. Microsoft, for example, will have two regions in the UK for Azure (London and Cardiff) and two for Office 365 (Durham and London). Amazon will only have a single AWS zone: London. (Europe retains Frankfurt, Ireland, and Paris.) The other public cloud providers do not fare much better. Post-GDPR, data sovereignty will be front and center. So, what exactly can you do if you want, need, or desire to be totally in the public cloud: sell your customers in Europe and the world and not fall foul of transnational data-protection laws? A multicloud may be the answer.

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MultiCloud Puppet Master

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Tom Howarth

Tom Howarth is an IT Veteran of over 20 years experience and is the owner of PlanetVM.Net Ltd, Tom is a moderator of the VMware Communities forum. He is a contributing author on VMware vSphere(TM) and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing ESX and the Virtual Environment, and the forthcoming vSphere a Quick Guide. He regularly does huge virtualization projects for enterprises in the U.K. and elsewhere in EMEA. Tom was Elected vExpert for 2008 and each subsequent year thereafter.